The leader in content quality

Country Park Herbs

Grazing and Pasture

05/31/2017

Worm management is an important aspect of rotational grazing and cross grazing pastures. There will almost always be some worms in the pasture and in the horses; the management aim is to minimise loads and prevent adverse effects on the horses from worms.  Removing horse poo from paddocks and composting it is an effective means of controlling worms in the pasture. Active dung beetles will also control worm loads, because worm eggs do not survive the passage through the dung beetles’ digestive tract.

05/31/2017

In this new and exclusive series, Dr Mariette van den Berg will take you on a journey of discovery of the grazing life of horses, exploring how herbivores and plants have adapted to not just co-exist, but benefit each other and thrive.  You will learn that both plants and horses constantly respond to their environment and have a well-developed ability to make wise-decisions to protect themselves and avoid costly mistakes.  (Yes, we will show you that just like horses and other animals, plants make decisions and even learn!).   

03/30/2017

This month, we celebrate dung beetles! For horse owners, dung beetles mean mean less cleaning paddocks and poo shovelling, and great soil development, without cost or effort - all things that align with the permaculture principles.  Dung beetles also benefit your horse’s health by helping control fly and parasitic worm populations. While this is great news for all horse and cattle owners, these tiny workers need the right conditions to establish and thrive.

05/31/2017

While many horse owners are quite aware of the importance of providing roughage to our horses - either from pasture and/or conserved forages - there are different aspects to consider when deciding on what conserved forage you should feed to your horses and how much you should provide (e.g. quality versus quantity).

04/27/2017

How many horses can you keep on the land you have? The short answer is it depends on many factors - most importantly the land’s carrying capacity and how you manage it.  The land’s carrying capacity will depend on factors, such as climate, soil type, soil condition and fertility, slope (aspect), water and pasture base. If you want to obtain all your horses’ forage requirements from your land, you will require much more land than you will if you are buying in feed. 

04/27/2017

While many horse owners are quite aware of the importance of providing roughage to our horses - either from pasture and/or conserved forages - there are different aspects to consider when deciding on what conserved forage you should feed to your horses and how much you should provide (e.g. quality versus quantity). This series explains the latest advances and recommendations for feeding conserved forage presented in a recent review paper (Harris et al. 20161), which was initiated by the European Workshop for Equine Nutrition (EWEN) meeting held in Portugal in 2012.

03/30/2017

This is the time when Winter annual plants germinate. Germination occurs due to a complex interaction between moisture, temperature and day length.  In Summer rainfall areas, the newly emergent plants will appear among the remnants of the Summer-growing pastures. While, in Winter rainfall areas, they give a green flush to previously dry, brown paddocks.  This newly emerging green is your horses’ Winter grazing, so nurture it.

03/30/2017

While many horse owners are aware pasture and conserved forages should be the basis of horse diets (even in performance horses), there are different aspects to consider when deciding what type of conserved forage you should feed your horses and how much you should provide - quality vs. quantity.  Over the next three issues of Horses and People, we will bring you the latest advances and recommendations for feeding conserved forage highlighted in a recent review of the scientific findings in equine nutrition. 

02/28/2017

Research has shown pasture-induced laminitis occurs at times of rapid grass growth. The accumulation of certain non-structural carbohydrates (NSC’s), including fructans, starches and sugars in pasture forage during the Spring, early Summer and Autumn, particularly after rainfall, precipitate this laminitis.  Therefore, we must carefully manage pasture turnout and forage intake in horses and ponies that are at risk for developing laminitis or are currently affected by this condition. 

02/28/2017

Although officially Autumn, March really is the tail end of Summer in Australia. Change is in the air. Days are getting shorter and temperatures beginning to drop. In Summer-rainfall areas the rain is coming to an end, while in Winter-rainfall areas, the end of the dry approaches. 

Pages

Subscribe to Grazing and Pasture