Country Park Herbs

Nutrition

01/30/2017

In this Part Four of our exclusive report from the European Workshop on Equine Nutrition (EWEN), Dr Mariette van den Berg discusses a recent study by Professor Meriel Moore-Colyer and colleagues, which examined the effect of soaking on the bacterial profile of meadow hay and perennial rye grass hay - two hay types that are commonly fed to horses in the United Kingdom.

11/30/2016

Owners or trainers of hard working performance horses are generally aware of the need to provide salt to meet their horse’s daily requirements and to replace electrolytes lost in sweat during a strenuous workout.  But, what about horses with less strenuous exercise regimens? For example, the weekend trail riding horse, the daily plodder or the much-loved paddock ornament. Do they need salt added to their daily diet too?  First, let’s identify what salt is and its role in the body.

10/31/2016

Horses can become dehydrated for a number of reasons... For example, during Summer when the weather is hot and horses naturally sweat more, or during Winter when the water may be too cold to drink. Additionally, horses may be required to travel substantial distances to competition venues and, during or following travel, horses may exhibit signs of stress, such as sweating. During outings, horses may not consume adequate water and feed intake may also be restricted leading to varying degrees of dehydration.

01/27/2017

Name: Red Sage Biological Name: Salvia officinalis Parts Used: Leaves and sometimes the roots Contains: Alpha-thujone, aluminum, beta-sitosterol, beta-thujone, bioflavonoids, bitter, borneol, bromine, calcium, camphor, carbohydrates, cineole, diterpenes, essential oil, fats, fibre, flavones, glycosides, iron, linalool, magnesium, oestrogenic substances, phenolic acids, phosphorus, pinene, potassium, protein, resin, rosmarinic acid, salvene, silica, sodium, steroids, tannins, thujone, triterpenes, vitamins B3, B12, C and zinc.

01/27/2017

How to get your horse that perfect topline is what we are all after, but first we must understand what a topline is!  The topline of the horse includes the withers, back loin (or coupling) and croup. Strength of topline and loin muscles also influences soundness and athletic ability. The topline will vary in length and in curvature, with some relationship between the two. The shape of the back can vary greatly from horse to horse. 

01/11/2017

Increasing research into conditions such as obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, laminitis, colic, stomach ulcers, rhabdomyolysis, feed hygiene, as well as behavioural abnormalities, have often pointed towards one common important factor in their prevention and management: the correct feeding of forage.  This has led a number of top experts in equine nutrition and health in Europe to work together and review the large body of updated and new knowledge, which has come to light in the past 15 years. 

01/11/2017

Increasing research into conditions such as obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, laminitis, colic, stomach ulcers, rhabdomyolysis, feed hygiene as well as behavioural abnormalities have often pointed towards one common important factor in their prevention and management: the correct feeding of forage. 

11/30/2016

Name: Horsetail  Biological Name: Equisetum spp. arvense and hyemale Parts Used: Aerial parts Contains: Alkaloids, aluminum, bitter, caffeic acid, calcium, carbohydrates, carotene, chromium, dimethyl sulphone (MSM), fats, fibre, flavonoids (quercetin, equicetrin), flavoglycosides, iron, magnesium, manganese, nicotine, organic acids, phenolic acids, phosphorus, potassium, quercetin glycosides, resin, saponin equisetrine, selenium, silica (high), sodium, starch, sterols, sulphur, tannins and vitamins A, B2, B2, B3, B5, C and D.

11/30/2016

Obesity is becoming a major health concern in horses (and people) all around the world, and is increasingly recognised as an equine welfare issue because it compromises both health and performance, so can you recognise if your horse is too fat or, for that matter, too thin? 

10/31/2016

Name: Arnica Biological Name: Arnica montana Parts Used: Dried flowers Contains: Arnicin, bitters, carotenoids, flavonoids, glycosides alkaloid, inulin, isobutyric ester of phlorol, lactones, mucilage, resin, polysaccharides, sesquiterpene lactones, tannins, thymol and thymohydroquinone dimethl ether.

Pages

Subscribe to Nutrition