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Nutrition

Aloe Vera

May 2016

Name: Aloe Vera Biological Name: Aloe barbadensis Parts Used: The aloe vera extract is made by pulverising the whole leaves of the plant. Aloe vera juice is generally made from the inner leaf only.

Feeding Horses with Respiratory Conditions

June 2016

Respiratory diseases can be costly for the horse owner in many ways. The major categories of respiratory diseases affecting horses are infectious (those caused by viruses or bacteria), allergic and parasitic.  This article will focus on respiratory issues caused by allergens. But first, in order to understand how these allergens affect the respiratory system, we must have a basic idea of how it works. Overview of the respiratory system

Borage

June 2016

Name: Borage Biological name: Borago officinalis Parts used: Aerial parts, however only the seeds are used for essential oil preparation. Contains: Alpha linolenic acid, alkaloids, asparagon, calcium, choline, gamma linolenic acid (GLA) (seeds), hexadecenoic acid, linolenic acid, malic acid, mineral salts (a valuable source of), mucilage (high), polyunsaturated fats (rich), potassium, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, saponins, tannins, trace elements, vitamins A and C.

What's Super about Super Fibres?

April 2016

You may be familiar with 'super fibre' products, such as sugarbeet pulp, soyhulls and haylage, but what makes these products stand out as superior sources of digestible energy amongst their traditional forage counterparts hay and chaff? The short answer is they have been shown to be more digestible than hay, possess superior fermentation characteristics and, ultimately, are an excellent source of digestible energy.  Digestibility

Does Soaking Hay Really Reduce Carbohydrate Content?

July 2016

Hay is the primary component of the equine diet. In recent years, with the increased incidence of metabolic disorders, such as laminitis and insulin resistance, the carbohydrate content of hay has come into question.  Pasture-associated laminitis is currently thought to be a sequel to over-consumption of certain carbohydrate fractions in forages, potentially associated with the development of chronic metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, especially in overweight animals.  Water soluble carbohydrates (WSC), in particular, are the predominant culprits in most grass forages.

Can Super Fibres Fuel Performance?

July 2016

Last month, Karen Richardson discussed the digestive and fermentation characteristics of ‘super fibre’ products (i.e. haylage, sugarbeet pulp, soyhulls) that make them more energy-dense than other fibrous products, such as hay and chaff. This month, she investigates whether super fibres have what it takes to fuel hard working performance and racing horses.

Dandelion

July 2016

Name: Dandelion Biological name: Taraxacum officinale Parts used: Whole plant (roots and leaves).

Beef Casserole

July 2016

Beef Casserole

The Super in Super Fibres

June 2016

You may be familiar with ‘super fibre’ products, such as sugarbeet pulp, soyhulls and haylage, but what makes these products stand out as superior sources of digestible energy amongst their traditional forage counterparts, hay and chaff? The short answer is super fibres have been shown to be more digestible than hay, possess superior fermentation characteristics and, ultimately, are an excellent source of digestible energy. Digestibility

Research-Based Nutrition with EquiFeast

June 2016

We would all love to think that everything we feed to our horses has been researched in great detail. Sadly, this is not even remotely true. Most of the effort by feed companies still revolves around unlocking the mysteries of starch, fats, protein and other forms of energy, while research into vitamins and minerals is really sparse.

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